Some Information on TRIZ in the world

WHAT IS TRIZ?

TRIZ is Russian acronym meaning Theory of the Solution of Inventive Problems. Genrikh Altshuller and his colleagues studied over 2 millions patents and identified the body of principles and knowledge that define the process of solving extremely difficult (i.e., inventive) problems. International research is now enhancing and extending their findings.

TRIZ is a revolutionary new technology being introduced in the United States!

The Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ) was first introduced to the United States in 1991.

WHAT DOES TRIZ DO FOR BUSINESS?

It has become even more difficult to conceive, develop and field breakthrough products and services consistently in today's global marketplace. The pace of competition, the increasing demands of customers, and the explosion of knowledge and technology all contribute to the need for innovative approaches. The conceptual activity has to be faster than ever before, at a higher level of design maturity, and within constrained budgets. Current research shows that TRIZ accelerated idea generation for products, for services, and for quality improvement by factors ranging from 70% to 300%

IS TRIZ PRACTICAL ? These practical organizations are now using TRIZ:

Statement of teaching TRIZ in MIT (USA)

 

By The Editors

The Advanced Institute of Technology of the Samsung Corporation has recognized the work of Nikolay Shpakovsky with a very significant corporate award.

The savings of 120 billion won is the equivalent of US$ 91,200,000.

Nikolay described the TRIZ training being done at Samsung, for more than 2000 employees, at the ETRIA meeting and in his paper in the December 2001 TRIZ Journal. Samsung has generously agreed to allow Nikolay and his colleagues to share their training methods with the TRIZ community through a series of articles that will appear throughout the year.

When the editors asked if we could publish the announcement of the award, Nikolay asked if he could add the following note, about the people who contributed to all the TRIZ work at Samsung:

"This award was undoubtedly a pleasant surprise to me. I am happy to have made that contribution to our TRIZ thriftbox , which is a weighty proof of the TRIZ efficiency. During all my work I had to solve problems of different degree of complexity, to turn aside patents and to forecast the evolution of technical systems. It is interesting enough that the simplest problems that arise in mass production generally turn out to be difficult to solve. This is because there are certain limitations; it is necessary to remove a disadvantage practically without changing anything in the production process. That is, it is necessary to apply to the full extent the TRIZ approach according to which everything remains as it was, but the disadvantage is removed.

"I am certainly grateful to the management of Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology. This is not only a natural feeling of gratitude for the award, but the expression of respect for the far-seeing and forethoughtful people who discerned the possibility of getting high profits by using TRIZ and provided for the efficient work of TRIZ specialists.

"It is quite natural that such the appreciation of my work is the merit of our entire group working for Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology. First of all I would like to thank the TRIZ specialist from Sankt-Petersburg Vasily Leniashin, who has been my workfellow for some years. I confirm with great pleasure his active participation in solving many of the problems and I am grateful to him for efficient cooperation. In addition to problem solving we actively work on perfecting the TRIZ methodology in order to tie it up to the full extent to the process of solving real production problems (see our article published in your journal http://www.trizjournal. com/archives/2002/01/f/index.htm).

"I also think it appropriate to recognize the great personal contribution of Nikolay Khomenko who was the first to start teaching TRIZ to Korean specialists and who continues this work today. It is necessary to make mention of Dmitry Kucheryavy, why developed and confirmed this first success by practical consulting work for LG. I also express my gratitude to other TRIZ specialists who successfully work today here, in Suwon. They are, first of all, Peter Chuksin and Alexander Skuratovich from Minsk, Valery Chernyak from Sankt-Petersburg and many other Russian and Korean specialists working mainly for LG and SAMSUNG. This is just owing to their work that the atmosphere of cooperation in the development of TRIZ methodology was created here and the Korean Group of TRIZ study was formed with the professor of Korean Polytechnic University Young-Il Kim at its head. The group unites over 120 representatives of production companies, research institutes and universities from different regions of Korea."

Picture: Nikolay Shpakovsky receiving the award:

 

The letter from Karen Gadd

From: Karen Gadd at Oxford Creativity

Sent: Tuesday, September 24, 2013 6:23 PM

To: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Subject: Korean Innovation Success: 95,000 patents in 2012 (UK: 7,000)

Samsung claim that power of TRIZ has helped their phenomenal success over the last 12 years and is central to their policy of growth through innovation. (see the Forbes article here).

I try to be a great champion of TRIZ (by establishing it in many major companies) but in July this year even I was astonished at the national importance of TRIZ when I was keynote speaker at the Korean TRIZ Global conference. Several Korean senior executives from their major companies talked about how their substantial investment in TRIZ Capability had massively paid off in terms of new innovative products, leading the world in IP and bottom line growth.

Korea has a very different atmosphere from Europe: here, despite its obvious power, TRIZ acceptance has been patchy and TRIZ often gets squashed by other more popular toolkits despite its complementary role to fill in all their universal gaps on problem solving and innovation. If anyone asks how has Korea (population 50 million - and a developing country in living memory) moved to No. 4 in the world in IP league tables with 95,000 granted patents in 2012 (whilst the UK has moved down to No. 12 with just over 7,000 patents) one answer is clearly TRIZ.

Korea's national espousal of TRIZ is very exciting and paying big results. I remember in 2000 one of the Samsung TRIZ engineers saying to me - "in Korea we are going to stop following and start leading and we are doing this with TRIZ" - and they have done it in spades. Their investment in TRIZ is phenomenal and even my book TRIZ for Engineers (published by Wiley Blackwell) has already been translated into Korean and I have been invited back to Seoul for further work. This is because in the Korean TRIZ community they were amazed how Oxford Creativity can make TRIZ so easy to learn and apply and wanted to know more about our straightforward approaches to the world's most powerful innovation toolkit. (see cartoon below)

Establishing TRIZ in Europe is essential for our success too. Oxford Creativity is the leading European TRIZ company and we have developed fast, simple ways of building TRIZ capability which works well with European engineers and management. We can show you how TRIZ acts as a multiplier on human intelligence, confidence, experience and wisdom, and helps you get the most from your most valuable asset: your people and your teams. In Oxford Creativity we say "TRIZ turns good engineers into great engineers" as it was developed by engineers for engineers who show uncharacteristic enthusiasm for this toolkit. Moreover really successful TRIZ companies have migrated it from engineering up to top management. Nowhere is that clearer than in Korea: part of Samsung's success with TRIZ is a result of making TRIZ training compulsory for all senior management. This has led to not only awareness but also enthusiasm and support for TRIZ throughout the organisation. In the UK we have had many proven successes with TRIZ (including companies such as Rolls-Royce and BAE Systems) which results in dramatic improvement of patent outputs, innovation success and helps engineering teams to work more effectively.

As Europe slowly wakes up to the power of this unique innovation and problem solving toolkit Japan, China and Korea use TRIZ to increase their global lead in IP. This year I have also been working in China where openness and enthusiasm for TRIZ is paying off. One major UK university contacted Oxford Creativity after their Chinese partners asked them "How much TRIZ do you teach to everyone" and their response had been "what is TRIZ and how can we use it?". That is a question Oxford Creativity have been successfully answering for fifteen years.

Contact us NOW to find out what TRIZ can do for you.

Regards,

Karen Gadd

01993 882461

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

A few places are still available on our next workshops: to book click here.

Learn TRIZ

30 September - 4 October at Beeston Manor

11-15 November at Oxford University

Oxford TRIZ for Patent Busting and Patent Building

2-4 December at Oxford University

If you have received this email in error or your details have changed, please contact me.

To unsubscribe from this mailing list, please send me an email with the subject "Unsubscribe"

 

What Makes Samsung Such An Innovative Company?

http://www.forbes.com/sites/haydnshaughnessy/2013/03/07/why-is-samsung-such-an-innovative-company/?utm_source=GraphicMail&utm_medium=email&utm_term=NewsletterLink&utm_campaign=Samsung+September+2013+*&utm_content=

The Samsung headquarters (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There are critics of Samsung who argue that its success is mostly due to copying and then tweaking the innovations of others. There is a good deal of truth in this, especially around the early Galaxy designs.

But Samsung is a global leader in screen technology, TVs, batteries, and chip design. So in terms of innovation it is doing a lot right. But we know very little about how.

We know how its competitors innovate we look at Google and see the 20% time, the big adjacencies, the search for disruption, the bold statements about the future of autos, for example.

We know that within Apple when a project gets to a critical stage, the company assigns three teams to its development, each of which competes against the other. We know the importance of design thinking, an attribute Google is learning about. And of customer experience.

What does Samsung do in comparison? How does it line up against these American masters or conversely are Google and Apple good enough to compete against Samsung?

There's no doubt that patent circumvention is an aim when Samsung innovates. From its early forays into innovation, competing against Toshiba in washing and drying machines, Samsung has chased patents in areas where its competitors appear to have protection and has oriented its innovation efforts to find new patentable ideas in its competitors' backyard (see, for example, this Samsung presentation).

There's nothing unusual about that. It is a sideshow.

Two developments convinced the company in the late 1990s and early 2000s that they could adopt a systematic approach to innovation and that is what seems to underpin their current success.

The first development provides a broader explanation for Samsung's innovation capacity. In the late 1990s they were able to tap into a source of cheap scientific expertise in the former Soviet Union.

Samsung has nurtured a close relationship with the Russian Academy of Science since then. There is a framework agreement between the two parties. And the Korean Government has its own agreement under which it funds Korean small businesses to develop projects on the back of Academy research. Samsung meanwhile appears to help the Academy to increase its patent count and to exploit its inventions.

There is an undated copy of the framework agreement between them online and here is an extract:

Academy warrants that Institutes of RAS have the necessary authority to transfer Inventions on separate contracts ("Concrete Agreement") to Samsung for evaluation, and support Samsung to share part in ownership of Inventions and Patents

One early advantage for Samsung was cheap fundamental science from Russia. But even now Samsung is able to buy Russian expertise at relatively low rates of between $3,000 to $5,000 per month.

Compare that with Google and Apple in the post-9/11 era access to the world's best talent has become increasingly difficult because of a reluctance to grant enough visas. Samsung had that problem cracked. But then again didn't Apple and Google both are a magnet for talent.

Has the Russian connection shown concrete value for Samsung?

Right now Samsung is working on 3D projection and display with the Academy. In 2009 BusinessWeek reported that Samsung relied on its relationships with Russian experts for its smartphone software development, adding:

Russian brains helped Samsung develop the image-processing chips in its digital TVs and refine its frequency-filtering technology that significantly reduced noise on its now-ubiquitous handsets.

But a second effect of the relationship with Russian science was the introduction of TRIZ, an innovation method that Samsung adopted from 2000 onwards but which only reached American companies from the mid-2000s onwards (Intel is a user).

TRIZ is a methodology for systematic problem solving. Typical of its origins in Russia, it asks users to seek the contradictions in current technological conditions and customer needs and to imagine an ideal state that innovation should drive towards.

Samsung had early successes with TRIZ, saving over $100 million in its first few projects. It was also adopting Six Sigma at the time.

But it was TRIZ that became the bedrock of innovation at Samsung. And it was introduced at Samsung by Russian engineers whom Samsung had hired into its Seoul Labs in the early 2000s.

In 2003 TRIZ led to 50 new patents for Samsung and in 2004 one project alone, a DVD pick-up innovation, saved Samsung over $100 million. TRIZ is now an obligatory skill set if you want to advance within Samsung.

At the Samsung Advanced Institute for Technology, Hyo June Kim, who wrote The Theory of Inventive Problem Solving, a foundation text on TRIZ published in Korean, trained over 1,000 engineers across Samsung companies in 2004 alone.

What we know from this is how Samsung approaches innovation. It is not a competitive race, as it seems to be in Apple, or based on giving engineers more bench time as it is at Google.

Rather it is based on developing a creative elite. The diagram below explains that. It is taken from this presentation. The presentation also explains how Samsung used TRIZ to get to its Super AMOLED displays.

Interestingly for Samsung observers, senior management had realized that the company was a fast follower rather than an innovator, prior to the introduction of TRIZ:

Samsung Electronics has a sense of crisis that we have been a fast follower and we can not survive anymore in this position. Instead of leading the industry by developing innovative products, we have followed fast what the leading companies had developed. Top management pointed out this and asked employee not to be a fast follower, but to be an innovative leader.

TRIZ is now part of Samsung's workflow.

At Samsung even the subsidiary CEO has to take TRIZ training. From looking at the various presentations I estimate that engineers get about 15 days of training plus 7 days specific project work. That's quite an investment in method and people.

So the answer to why Samsung is so innovative with at least two major product announcements this month is that it is heavily invested in its people, it goes in search of special talent wherever it can find it, but specifically made astute moves into Russia early on; it targets its innovations towards specific competitors and patents that it wants to overhaul (as Apple did under Jobs); and it has an innovation culture based on extensive training, repeatable methodology and creative elite formation, backed by the highest levels of management.

You can argue that method and creativity don't go together but that's a specious argument from the start.

You can also argue that Apple and Google have better innovation processes, more free and more compelling for talented engineers. But what you can't argue is that Samsung does not do innovation. It is proving every day that it is formidable and heavily invested in taking leadership in many areas.

The message for Apple and Google get used to it because Samsung is not only on a roll, it has enough talented people to keep pushing.

 

Books on TRIZ in the world

In Vietnamese: click here

In Russian:

ruPIDC
ruJOTR ruNTVO ruPIDC ruPIDC
ruPIDC ruPIDC ruPIDC

In English:

CREATIVITY AS AN EXACT SCIENCE : THE THEORY OF THE SOLUTION OF INVENTIVE PROBLEMS

Genrikh S. Altshuller (translated by Anthony Williams)

Hardcover (January 1984)

Gordon & Breach Science Publishers

318 pages, Price: $222.00

40 PRINCIPLES : TRIZ KEYS TO TECHNICAL INNOVATION

G. S. Altshuller (translated and edited by Lev Shulyak and Steven Rodman), 1998, Soft Cover

140 pages, Price: $ 40.00

AND SUDDENLY THE INVENTOR APPEARED : TRIZ, THE THEORY OF INVENTIVE PROBLEM SOLVING

G.S. Altshuller (translated by Lev Shulyak)

1996, Soft Cover

171 pages, Price: $40.00

THE INNOVATION ALGORITHM: TRIZ, THE THEORY OF INVENTIVE PROBLEM SOLVING

Genrich Altshuller (translated by Lev Shulyak and Steven Rodman)

1998, Paperback

312 pages, Price: $250.00

TRIZ: THE RIGHT SOLUTION AT THE RIGHT TIME

A Guide to Innovative Problem Solving

Yuri Salamatov,

Edited by Valeri Souchkov

1999, Soft Cover

Price: $59.95

SYSTEMATIC INNOVATION: AN INTRODUCTION TO TRIZ (THEORY OF INVENTIVE PROBLEM SOLVING)

John Terminko, Alla Zusman, Boris Zlotin

Published 1998, Paperback

150 pages, Price: $23.96

STEP-BY-STEP TRIZ : CREATING INNOVATIVE SOLUTION CONCEPTS

John Terninko, Alla Zusman, Boris Zlotin

1996, Spiral Bound

228 pages, Price: $ 40.00

THE SCIENCE OF INNOVATION, A MANAGERIAL OVERVIEW OF THE TRIZ METHODOLOGY

Victor R. Fey & Eugene I. Rivin, 1997, Soft Cover

82 pages, Price: $ 27.00

TRIZ RESEARCH REPORT

Price: Non-member $19.95

Member $17.95

Contents:

Introduction

TRIZ in Depth

Case Studies

Implementation

1996. 48 pages. ISBN 1-879364-99-9.

Contact GOAL/QPC

ruJOTR ruNTVO ruPIDC ruPIDC
ruPIDC ruPIDC ruPIDC ruPIDC
ruPIDC ruPIDC ruPIDC ruPIDC
ruPIDC ruPIDC ruPIDC ruPIDC
ruPIDC ruPIDC ruPIDC ruPIDC
ruPIDC ruPIDC ruPIDC ruPIDC

In French:

ruJOTR ruNTVO ruPIDC ruPIDC

In Germany:

ruJOTR ruNTVO ruPIDC ruPIDC
ruJOTR ruNTVO ruPIDC ruPIDC
ruJOTR ruNTVO ruPIDC ruPIDC
ruJOTR ruNTVO ruPIDC ruPIDC

In Spanish:

ruJOTR

In Chinese:

ruJOTR ruNTVO ruPIDC ruPIDC
ruJOTR ruNTVO ruPIDC ruPIDC
ruJOTR ruNTVO ruPIDC ruPIDC
ruJOTR ruNTVO ruPIDC ruPIDC